» CCTC prints 3-D prosthetic hand for local seventh-grader

CCTC prints 3-D prosthetic hand for local seventh-grader

Central Carolina Technical College Engineering Graphics Technology
program prints 3-D prosthetic hand for local seventh-grader

Sumter, S.C. – This morning, Connor Morgan was given a free 3-D printed prosthetic right hand from Central Carolina Technical College’s Engineering Graphics Technology program. Using a publicly shared design, Engineering Graphics Technology Program Manager David Tuders and his students created and modified a prototype specifically designed for Connor. On February 6, while attending a field trip at CCTC’s Advanced Manufacturing Technology Training Center, Connor and his mother, Shanna Morgan, were surprised with a fitting for a prosthetic hand.

“This project has been in the works since December (2015), when Marian Marlowe, Clarendon School District 2 Instructional Coach, approached me while visiting the AMTTC.” David Tuders explains. “Ms. Marlowe had already spoken with a few colleges about this project, and while many seemed interested, there was no forward motion with the project. “CCTC was thrilled at the opportunity to engineer a hand, especially since it would benefit a young person like Connor,” Tuders said.

To create the hand, Tuders and his second-year students worked with three different software programs: AutoCad, AutoDesk Inventor and SolidWorks. The construction of the hand, which consists of 17 pieces, lasted a full week, while the printing of the final hand took approximately 15 hours. CCTC acquired its first 3-D printer in 2008. At the time, this type of technology was expensive and bulky. Now Tuders and his students use more compact 3-D printers capable of printing in plastic. For Connor’s hand, two specific printers were used, a MakerBot Z18 and a MarkerBot 2X.

Tuders’ passion for engineering graphics lives in the idea of “creating something out of nothing.” He continues, “You get to hold ideas in your hand. It is a fulfilling experience to take your idea, design it and make it come into existence. Connor’s prosthetic hand is a perfect example of the process.” Graduates of the Engineering Graphics Technology program find occupations as CAD Designers, Design Drafters, Mechanical Drafters, Architectural Drafters, CAD Operators, Computer-Aided Design Technicians, Civil Drafters and Drafters.

For more information regarding CCTC’s Engineering Graphics Technology program click here. 

Engineering Graphics Technology Program Manager David Tuders (left) and adjunct instructor Rick Lavergne make adjustments on Connor’s prosthetic hand.
Engineering Graphics Technology Program Manager David Tuders (left) and adjunct instructor Rick Lavergne make adjustments on Connor’s prosthetic hand.
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